Fall 2021 Newsletter

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The District’s website is regularly updated with information of interest to residents and homeowners. Stay up to date at http://www.scottpointwaterworks.com

2021 WATERING RESTRICTIONS LIFTED

The long period without significant rainfall led to declining well levels and caused the trustees to enact watering restrictions in July. But recent rainfall, decreasing daily consumption, and improvements in well water treatment have allowed some recovery of well levels. The watering restrictions were lifted on Sep 17. However, residents are reminded that water remains a scarce quantity on Scott Point and we need to make every drop count. 

It is also possible that climate change will make watering restrictions necessary on an annual basis.  Residents are asked to consider scheduling heavy water use activity such as power-washing for the early spring or the fall to avoid the low rainfall summer months.  Even better would be to use captured rainfall for such activities.  Better timing may help avoid or shorten future watering restrictions

SUMMER WATER CONSUMPTION

The trustees were pleased to note that in response to the watering restrictions, residents made changes to lower their water use and allow our wells to survive the drought. Almost all residents reduced their consumption and overall consumption in July and August was 20% lower than June (prior to restrictions); and 17% below 2020 levels. In June there were seven properties that used more than 3500 gallons in the month, in August there were only 2. Thank you to everyone.

TREATMENT UPGRADES

In July, we were experiencing problems with the Reverse Osmosis treatment at our main well that negatively impacted water quality and the volume of water rejected by the RO. New RO membranes were installed in August and the improvement was immediately noticeable.

Unfortunately the cost of new membranes is significant and forced trustees to re-examine planned capital spending. To stay within budget for 2021, a decision was made to defer planned major improvements at our Well 3, located along Long Harbour Road, until 2022.

WATER FILTRATION

Questions are often asked about water quality on Scott Point. It must be emphasized that at all times, water quality meets the requirements of the B.C. Drinking Water Protection Regulations and the Health Canada Guidelines for Drinking Water Quality. Some residents consider costly supplemental treatment, but trustees note that an inexpensive NSF 42 or 53 certified carbon filter such as a fridge filter, Brita jug, or small under-sink cartridge, (all changed at manufacturer’s recommended intervals) easily removes particulates and any residual chlorine taste. More information is available at http://www.scottpointwaterworks.com/water-quality-2/in-house-filtration/.

RAINWATER CAPTURE

The recent rainfall is a good reminder that now is a very good time to install rainwater capture tanks to be ready for gardening in 2022.

The Trustees strongly recommend that any resident interested in keeping up a garden or vegetable plot that requires regular watering, install a rainwater capture system. If stored, enough rainfall occurs during the fall and winter months to more than meet gardening needs. A medium sized tank, debris filter, and pump system capturing water from the eaves of a house or garage is easy to install, relatively inexpensive and can be done by a homeowner. More details from Salt Spring Watershed Protection Alliance and CRD are available on the website at http://www.scottpointwaterworks.com/water-conservation/rainwater-capture/

WATER USE REGULATIONS

Bylaw 117 was approved by the provincial Ministry and is now in force. This bylaw spells out the responsibilities of property owners in using water and dealing with the District’s facilities. A copy of the bylaw is available at http://www.scottpointwaterworks.com/by-laws/

GOING AWAY? – CLOSE YOUR SHUT-OFF VALVEResidents are reminded that if you will be absent for 3 days or more, you MUST close your shut-off valve at the street (Note: your shut-off valve is after the meter, and is not the District’s curb-stop that requires a key). If a leak occurs at an unoccupied house without the valve closed, the resident will be liable for the full cost of all water used.